• Kauffman Center
    Kauffman Center
  • Mulberry & St. Louis Ave.
    Mulberry & St. Louis Ave.
  • The Great 2017 Eclipse
    The Great 2017 Eclipse
  • Kansas City Street Car
    Kansas City Street Car
  • Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve
    Hills of Gold

Category: Wildlife

New LENS Day!! (Almost as exciting as New BIKE Day)

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A couple weeks ago I picked up the new Tamron 150-600 G2 lens. I wanted a lens with a long range, vibration control, a fast auto focus, sharpness from beginning to end, and something that didn’t break the wallet. It’s still the most expensive lens I’ve ever purchased, but cost a third of the Nikon equivalent. And I got it used, without the warranty ever being registered. Soooo…. JACKPOT!! I’m not going to get into any technical mumbo jumbo over the lens. Overall, I’m extremely happy! It met all my standards and then some, and when it comes to equipment, my standards are high. It did take a bit getting used too. I went from a full manual telephoto, that didn’t have VR, to the best telephoto lens on the market, right now. You would think it would have been an easy transition. But it was really like going from a flip phone to a iPhone in 2017. Other than that, and the tendonitis in my shoulder I seemed to have developed, the Tamron 150-600 G2 is as close to perfect as you can get, for a third party lens.

Below are a few shots and settings I have taken with the lens thus far.

Nikon D750 | 600mm | 1/1250 sec. | f/10.3 | ISO 800 | Handheld

Nikon D750 | 150mm | 1 sec. | f/6.3 | ISO 200 | Tripod

Nikon D750 | 600mm | 1/1600 sec. | f/6.3 | ISO 500 | Handheld

Nikon D750 | 300mm | 1/640 sec. | f/6.3 | ISO 320 | Handheld

Nikon D750 | 500mm | 1/1600 sec. | f/8.0 | ISO 500 | Handheld

Nikon D7200 | 550mm (825mm crop sensor equivalent) | 1/125 sec. | f/8.0 | ISO 200 | Handheld

Keep up on Flickr and Instagram for more frequent posts. Also, if you’d like prints, head over to Society6. <—- I WILL GET AROUND TO UPDATING THE SHOP SOON!



It’s Been a While…

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A frozen Missouri River steaming as the Sun Rises over the City.

Snowy Geese taking off out of Smithville Lake.

Bald Eagle flying low over the Missouri River. I saw six eagles this day!

Bortle Study. A study of light pollution and our (in)ability to view a night sky.

I was hoping to have more time to update the blog since the holiday, but the 9 to 5 has had me swamped. However, I have found time to do a lot of shooting, even if I can only get out for an hour or so. Above are a few of my favorite shots over the last month.

Angela and I spent last Sunday searching for the Snowy Owl at Smithville lake. We didn’t find it, but were in the right spot. It may have already started it’s journey back to the Arctic. We did however, see a lot of wildlife and a bunch of migrating Snow Geese. (there will be more photos from that afternoon to come soon.) I have also been tracking and following a Bald Eagle family along parts of the Missouri River, working on a Bortle Studies project (Our (in)ability to see a starry night sky in a heavily light polluted setting , and continuing my Kansas City 365 project.

Here’s to staying productive and becoming better in 2018. I’ll update you as much as I can along the way.

Keep up on Flickr and Instagram for more frequent posts. Also, if you’d like prints, head over to Society6.



World Rhino Day

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Black Rhinoceros

Western Lowland Gorilla

Taveta Golden Weaver

Grevy’s Zebra

In honor of World Rhino Day (one of the most critically endangered species on Earth.), I thought I’d share a few photos from my recent family vacation to Disney World. We visited Disney’s Animal Kingdom the day before Hurricane Irma impacted most of Florida. I was particularly excited about going to this park. Not, just to photograph animals and birds. But to be in the presence of many critically endangered animals, and learn more about what conservations efforts are being done to keep them from just becoming Zoo trophies. I was happy to learn that Disney invests a great deal in conservation and preserving animals natural habitats. They also do a great job on educating people on conservation efforts, through exhibits and hands on learning.

Back to the Black Rhinoceros. There are less than 5400 Black Rhinos left in the world, which makes them a CRITICALLY ENDANGERED species. And even worse, the West African Black Rhino was declared extinct in 2016 after not being seen in the wild in over a decade. Their decline in population was caused by European hunters in the 1850s, and more recently due to recent illegal trade. You can find more information here at WWE. And check out more about World Rhino Day here.

Also, picture above is another endangered species, the Western Lowland Gorilla. Their population has declined 60% in the last 20 years do to deforestation and hunting. Read more about them here.

Keep up on Flickr and Instagram for more frequent posts. Also, if you’d like prints, head over to Society6.



The Great 2017 Eclipse

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Composite of the 2017 solar eclipse in Kansas City, Missouri

View of Kansas City at totality of the 2017 solar eclipse

Diamond Ring phenomena that occurs just before and after totality

Diamond Ring phenomena that occurs just before and after totality

Diamond Ring phenomena that occurs just before and after totality

After a whirlwind weekend of traveling through the southwest (more of those photos to come in the near future), we came home to a packed city waiting to view the Eclipse of the century. I had planned out a spot on the northwest side of the city, that I hoped wouldn’t be too packed. When I arrived to setup around ten in the morning it was pouring down rain, but I was the only one in the park. 🙂 The rain let up around a quarter after a eleven, just in time to setup and start the eclipse. Around noon the park started to fill up with people. I think by the time the full eclipse happened, there were only 30 people in the park.

I setup three cameras to shoot the eclipse. One pointed towards the sun, one pointed towards the city, and the other setup to time-lapse as the shadow passed over. As the eclipse approached, the clouds started rolling in. We hit totality just before the clouds rolled in. Where I was setup, there was just over a minute of totality, with the clouds it was almost cut in half. But still made for some exciting shots, and I was still able to capture the Diamond Ring phenomena, which I was most excited about.

I hope you enjoy these photos as much as I do. Now it’s time to start planning for 2024.

Keep up on Flickr and Instagram for more frequent posts. Also, if you’d like prints, head over to Society6.



Liberty Bend at LaBenite Park

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LaBenite Park Nature Trail

Missouri River from LaBenite Park Nature Trail

Missouri River from LaBenite Park Nature Trail

Liberty Bend Bridge | Nikon D7200 | Rokinon 16mm | f/16 | ISO 100 | 10 sec. | 10 exposures

I spent some time at LaBenite Park last night, a new place for me. It had a nice nature trail, and a conversation area you can camp at with permits only. There were many access points to the river that aloud me to catch a great sunset, and got a few long exposures of the Liberty Bend Bridge. I’m still unsure if I will return to the park. It was a little sketchy and filled with trash. ALWAYS REMEMBER TO PACK IT IN, PACK IT OUT! But it has great history and was stop along the Lewis & Clark Expedition and It’s another place to check off my list of places to explore along the Missouri River.

Keep up on Flickr and Instagram for more frequent posts. Also, if you’d like prints, head over to Society6.



Learning and LOVING IT

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Bambi

Young buck along Missouri River Front Trail

Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)

Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)

Missouri River

Missouri River

Purple Crown Vetch (Coronilla varia)

Purple Crown Vetch (Coronilla varia)

I’ve been working on documenting/identifying wildflowers and birds I see while riding/hiking, alongside woking on my wildlife photography. I’ve recently figured out that I will need to update some of my equiptment to get the quality I’m looking for, but that will come in time. There are over a thousand photos I’m trying to get to, to edit, and share.

I’ve taken a small break from shooting in the city, but on the plus side, I’m shooting more than ever and LOVE IT!!!